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canada-rail

Ontario Railway Stations

Orillia

  • Image of railway station

    Grand Trunk Railway

    Publisher: Valentine & Sons, ca. 1910

  • Image of railway station

    Grand Trunk Railway

    Publisher: Valentine & Sons, ca. 1910

  • Image of railway station

    Grand Trunk Railway

    ca. 1920

  • Image of railway station

    Union Station (CN and CPR)

    ca. 1950

  • Image of railway station

    Canadian National Railway

    ca. 1964

  • Image of railway station

    Canadian National Railway

    ca. 1965

  • Image of railway station

    Canadian National Railway

    ca. 1987

  • Image of railway station

    Canadian National Railway (former)

    © Jeri Danyleyko, 2003

  • Image of railway station

    Canadian National Railway (former)

    © Jeri Danyleyko, 2015

  • Image of railway station

    Canadian National Railway (former)

    © Jeri Danyleyko, 2003

  • Image of railway station

    Canadian National Railway (former)

    © Jeri Danyleyko, 2003

  • Image of railway station

    Canadian Pacific Railway

    Publisher: Valentine & Sons, ca. early 1900s

  • Image of railway station

    Canadian Pacific Railway (former)

    © Jeri Danyleyko, 2012

The original Grand Trunk station was destroyed by fire in 1916. It was replaced with a far more substantial brick structure built by the GTR (later CN) in 1917. The building has historical designation and is now owned by the city of Orillia.

Information about the former CPR station is confusing. The station was likely built around 1911 when the CPR expanded into Orillia. During 1930s (possibly 1935) it was sold to the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 34. The CPR later moved into the CN station which in turn was used as a union station for many years.

Passenger service was discontinued in 1996. The station was converted to a bus terminal and also served as a hub for an assortment of government services. It was also occupied by the Chamber of Commerce who remained there until 2015 when their lease ended. Ironically the Chamber then moved onto the second floor of the Legion Hall and former CPR station. The station continues to be used for government services and as the main bus terminal.

Although the legion undoubtedly benefits from the much-needed rental income, the aging building is in need of major and costly repairs. It is not known whether the legion can raise sufficient funds to cover those costs.